Of teaching and adventure

Whenever I round that final bend at the end of the Keene Neck Road and look down upon what has to be one of the most marvelous views of the entire Maine coast, a flood of emotions and memories comes over me: many mornings spent there parking cars of incoming campers with Barry Transeau while I was on the camp staff, living at the top of the hill when my children were small, accompanying my dad in 1943 on a field trip to the hay field that was chronicled in a Life magazine article, as well as recalling decades of adventures on Hog Island.

The Audubon Camp has always included an enthusiasm for education in natural history that projects the Audubon spirit in a way that has always had a magic for me.

Bound up in those emotions is my realization of the impact upon my life that the associations with so many people there have had. Program content and personnel have changed over the years, but the teaching styles at the Audubon Camp in Maine have always included an enthusiasm for education in natural history that projects the Audubon spirit in a way that has always had a magic for me.

It is always a delight to return to Hog Island, and I look forward to the Alumni Work/Study session. But it will be a special joy to participate this summer for two weeks as a member of the teaching staff for the first time in over thirty years, and to visit once again that marvelous hay field on Nash’s Hill.

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